5 Meaningful Ways To Say Thank You To a Caregiver This Thanksgiving

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“Compassion automatically invites you to relate with people because you no longer regard people as a drain on your energy.” — Chogyam Trungpa

Can you think of anyone more deserving of your love and gratitude than a family caregiver?

This question started hunting me last week  …and with the exception of my parents for being who they are, and the impact they’ve had in my life, I couldn’t figure out who else would be next in line in terms of relevance and importance as much as a family caregiver!

Can you?

I’ll bet you a turkey leg you can’t!

Caregivers in general, whether they work through an agency, a family caregiver, or a volunteer, are invaluable …they are such an integral part of the fabric of our society that I shudder to think what would happen if they weren’t around.

So who better than a caregiver to show some warm and loving gratitude to this holiday season …here’s how you can do that!

  1. If you are related to someone caring for your parent with dementia or Alzheimer’s, offer to give them a day off on a day that best suits their schedule, and you can take over for a day.
  2. Send a handwritten note expressing your gratitude, love, and appreciation for their hard work and dedication.
  3. Replace them for one day with another caregiver and give them a gift card to a Spa, massage, or Salon day.
  4. Offer to help them at their own home, pay for a cleaning lady, car wash, or grocery shopping.
  5. Offer to help the caregiver with Holiday decorations, preparations and gift wrapping . Things like put up a tree, X-mas lights and any other tasks that could prove challenging with their busy schedule.

I’m sure you can come up with at least a dozen more meaningful ways to say thank you to a caregiver, by the way if you do, please share it with us in the comments below!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

320x320_crop_claudiopic –Claudio Alegre is the Chief Content Writer for Angel Home Care Services on the Web and Patient and Family Relations Advocate off the Web. He lives in Miami with his wife and 3 boys.

 

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We find ways to help families get the personal care services at home they need and deserve regardless of the insurance landscape or personal situation!

Call us With Your Questions or Concerns and Get Rid of All That Doubt and Uncertainty! 

CALL:   305-220-4544   [Miami Dade Area]

1-877-746-8908   [For Out of Area Families]

 

National Family Caregiver Month November 2015

 

National Family Caregiver Month November 2015

Congratulations for being who you are! –National Family Caregiver Month acknowledges the hard work of over 40 million caregivers in the U.S. who devote part of their lives to care for loved ones.

The month of November is a time for caregivers and support organizations to connect and create awareness for the over 40 million family or “informal” caregivers in the U.S. – unpaid family members or friends who take care of loved ones.

In 2014, President Barak Obama issued a Presidential Proclamation about National Family Caregiver Month, citing the important role caregivers play in the U.S. while encouraging us to acknowledge this role:

Not only this month, but every month, let us work alongside our Nation’s caregivers and make certain they are able to provide the best possible care for their loved ones for as long as necessary. Together, we recognize those who place service above self, including the women and men looking after our veterans. By offering them the same comfort, social engagement, and stability they bring to others, may we remind them that they are not alone.

For those involved in elder care — or for those who know someone who is — National Caregiver Month is an especially appropriate time to become even more engaged with the caregiving community through awareness campaigns and educational events.

National Family Caregiver Month Activities Worth Following

  • AARP is hosting a virtual Caregiver Fair on Thursday, November 19, 2015 from 12pm – 4pm EST. Register here to join the free fair online. The campaign also includes a Random Acts of Kindness for Caregivers contest, which encourages everyone to perform a kind gesture for a caregiver, post a brief story and photo. Participants earn a chance to win in a shared $10,000 prize pot. As well, AARP’s magazine October issue features a photo essay titled “A Day in the Life of an American Caregiver.”
  • The Alzheimer’s Association website has a section to honor caregivers as part of National Family Caregiver Month, which also coincides with National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Add a personal tribute to the Alzheimer’s Association blog, which asks “what does a caregiver look like?” Share your story here.
  • Caregiving.com encourages you to acknowledge National Family Caregiver Month in many ways. Participate in a Blogging Challenge for a chance to win $100 or in a group Solitaire Showdown with other site members. Do a seven-minute workout or share photos, join others in a Bible study, online chats and much more. Read more here.
  • Although not directly related to National Family Caregiver Month, a petition to create awareness about caregiver stress was created by Denise Brown and is still active. Brown is the founder of Caregiving.com and wrote 10 Reasons Why Caregiving Is an Epidemic to point out why caregivers need as much support as the patients in their charge. Sign the petition at Change.org.

Even if you hire help from a company like Angel Home Care Services, it’s important to honor yourself as a family caregiver — someone who cares enough to manage a loved one’s health needs.

You’re still a caregiver in many ways, even if you aren’t there for every single daily routine. Take a moment, too, to thank even hired caregivers and all who help support your loved one.

maria de los angelesMaria de los Angeles is an award-winning writer based in Miami who became a caregiver to her parents in 2008. Since then, she has been a passionate advocate for eldercare and caregiver issues.

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ATTENTION! Free Report Reveals Secret Formula For Getting Elder Care at Home …without going broke in the process!

We find ways to help families get the personal care services at home they need and deserve regardless of the insurance landscape or personal situation!

Call us With Your Questions or Concerns and Get Rid of All That Doubt and Uncertainty! 

CALL:   305-220-4544   [Miami Dade Area]

1-877-746-8908   [For Out of Area Families]

 

Support Groups Help Deal with Caregiver Burnout

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Support groups are invaluable for caregivers who feel overwhelmed by their responsibilities. Make them a priority in routine caregiver self-care.

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ATTENTION! Free Report Reveals Secret Formula For Getting Elder Care at Home …without going broke in the process!

The number one rule of caregiving is take care of yourself first. This rule is easy to overlook when we’re caught up in the daily routine of caregiving. The elderly, like children, often require constant attention and at the end of the day, it’s easy to overlook one’s own needs.

As a caregiver to my dearly departed mother and my father, who is still alive, I learned the hard way about the rule, which I would prefer to a call a survival strategy. The drive to care for a loved one eclipses the instinct for self-preservation in a counterproductive, vicious cycle: you can’t take good care of others if your own health isn’t optimal.

(For the purpose of this article, caregiver will refer to “family” or “informal” caregiver — one who provides unpaid assistance in daily living and medical needs — as opposed to “formal” caregiver — one who provides paid labor and who is available for hire through companies like Angel Home Care Services.)

While I don’t regret a minute spent caring for my parents, I can look back now and share what I would have done differently to alleviate caregiver burnout.

LESSONS LEARNED

For one, I would have benefited from being part of a support group; however, it never even dawned on me that one would be available to the estimated 43.5 million number of adult family caregivers who care for someone 50 years of age or older. (Source: Alzheimer’s Association via Caregiver.org). I was too busy to even think about adding another task to my plate. The last thing I wanted to do during my time off from caregiving was to talk about caregiving.

But I think it’s really important to talk as much as you can with people who are also experiencing the challenges of being a caregiver, which in my case, was being a single mom to my parents — a mother with Alzheimer’s, a father with dementia.

I was not alone! According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 14.9 family caregivers care for someone who has Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. (Source: Alzheimer’s Association via Caregiver.org).

Because we couldn’t always afford a sitter, the number of event invitations I declined kept climbing, which left me disconnected from my social network. My friends were sympathetic, but I couldn’t blame them if they got tired of hearing the same old story; I was the only one in my circle of friends caring for elderly parents. Their lives were flowing. Mine was at a standstill.

Even if I had hired services from companies such as Angel Home Care Services, I still would have found solace in making new friends facing similar challenges in their social and professional lives. My sense of isolation and loneliness would have been mitigated had I reached out to support groups.

NEVER TOO LATE TO SEEK CAREGIVER SUPPORT

Luckily, earlier this year, I found a local Miami bereavement support group through Jewish Community Services, which provides numerous services to the community at large, regardless of religious affiliation. Although I attend this group to honor the memory of my mother, it has helped me tremendously in what I call the “pre-grieving” stage for my father. Having experienced the death of a beloved parent is one thing; knowing that the death of the other parent is imminent is wholly another.

I know now that it would have made a world of difference to make “me time” and gather with other caregivers.

At the group, there is no judgment. Some members are still grieving family or friends who passed years ago. For others, the pain is fresh. Some have lost children, while others have lost spouses. Like me, many have been caregivers. Two facilitators lead the group, but we are all co-creators in the talk.

I’m glad that I found this group, which meets twice a month. Although I can’t turn back the clock for how I dealt with the stresses of caregiving while my mother was still alive, it’s helping me tremendously now that I still advocate for my father. It’s time well spent and a respite I look forward to every month.

It’s not too late for me to reap the benefits of a support group. The sense of friendship in the group and the patience with which we all listen to each other brings me peace and comfort. I feel relaxed — the perfect antidote from burnout.

If you’re caregiving for a parent, I strongly encourage you to seek out a support group in your area. If you’re not able to attend one in person, there are online resources. I’ll share more about available resources in a follow-up post.

In the meantime, don’t forget to take of yourself.

maria de los angelesMaria de los Angeles is an award-winning writer based in Miami who became a caregiver to her parents in 2008. Since then, she has been a passionate advocate for eldercare and caregiver issues.

We find ways to help families get the personal care services at home they need and deserve regardless of the insurance landscape or personal situation!

Call us With Your Questions or Concerns and Get Rid of All That Doubt and Uncertainty! 

CALL:   305-220-4544   [Miami Dade Area]

1-877-746-8908   [For Out of Area Families]

The Supply and Demand of Caring and How The Best Caregivers Get Better

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“You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing.”
― George Bernard Shaw

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ATTENTION! Free Report Reveals Secret Formula For Getting Elder Care at Home …without going broke in the process!

Caregivers get pulled, stretched, pushed, shoved, knocked and grilled by so many elements of their daily grind.

It never ceases to amaze and delight me when I meet or talk to a caregiver whose attitude is pure hope, optimism and grit.

Such is the case with Mr. Smith, whose wife has a chronic condition that has her confined to a bed indefinitely.

Lately we’ve been struggling with getting him a much needed item on time and ample supply.

Not our fault, but it doesn’t matter! As an Agency we are responsible for solving problems.

Mr. Smith calls our office quite often in regards to this item. He’s very concerned, but courteous and understanding of the realities of a healthcare system that’s not perfect but it’s what we have.

We are in short supply of this item, he knows it, I can feel the frustration in his voice. He is torn by what he feels and what he won’t say. I know that and it frustrates me, we have to fix this now!

Our medical supplies company has let us down time and time again, why are we still with them?

It’s Friday 5:30pm, the Mr. Smith is out of supplies and my supplier is not picking up the phone. I’ve had enough!

I call the local retail supplier for that specific item, they have 4 of them left, I buy them at three and a half times my normal cost, but I don’t care at this point. I’m obsessed with not putting us and Mr. Smith/caregiver in this position again!

I bought enough to last me the weekend. First thing Monday I fired our existing supplier and called a well know local wholesaler … it’s a long shot, these guys sell by the pallet, large shipments overseas and only to large domestic suppliers. We are a small family-ran home care agency with a problem they couldn’t possibly relate to or care about!

But I asked anyway, it so happens they are starting a division in their company to service smaller providers in our local area, they literally started this last week. I was their first client!

My item was so unique they didn’t have it in stock, but the HERO I was dealing with went out of his way to set me up, he already knew my story and totally identified with it. I was blown away!

I ordered a total of 8 boxes, at better pricing than my original supplier. I’m also making a list of other supplies we will order from this company from now on. That’s how you build loyalty, you help people solve problems.

I personally delivered the units to Mr. Smith, I could see the relief in his face and felt the gratitude in his handshake.

But Mr. Smith also taught me a lesson that I think all caregivers should take notice of.

Here are a few caregiving tips that will make you THRIVE instead of just cope:

  1. Work to find solutions to your problems, not problems in the solutions.Mr. Smith patiently worked through this particular issue with us and together we got it done.
  2. Build a human relationship with your provider and learn to leverage the professional help around you. Mr. Smith is always courteous and respectful of the nurses and case managers he came in contact with, and they learned to appreciate him as much as he appreciates them. In the process he learned how things work.
  3. Never despair. Even though there were times when we were all frustrated, neither Mr. Smith nor We gave up.
  4. Keep a positive attitude. As I said at the start, Mr. Smith attitude dictates his outcome and process, as with all things in life. I think he understands there are few things you control, but one’s attitude is definitely one you can.

No one takes a journey alone. Let’s learn from each other!

By the way the Hero who saved the day is Luis Arias from Surgimed – Located at 1303 NW 78 Ave, Doral FL 33126 | 305.594.1121. If you are a provider and need a reliable medical supplies company, get in touch with Luis.

Further reading:

Thank you so much for reading! If you enjoyed it, please scroll down and click the Recommend button and Share on your favorite Social Network. It would mean a lot to me :-)

Keep Caring-

Claudio

320x320_crop_claudiopicClaudio Alegre is the Chief Content Writer for Angel Home Care Services on the Web and Patient and Family Relations Advocate off the Web. He lives in Miami with his wife and 3 boys.

 

We find ways to help families get the personal care services at home they need and deserve regardless of the insurance landscape or personal situation!

Call us With Your Questions or Concerns and Get Rid of All That Doubt and Uncertainty! 

CALL:   305-220-4544   [Miami Dade Area]

1-877-746-8908   [For Out of Area Families]

17 Not-So-Obvious But Unmistakable Warning Signs Your Parent Is Declining in Function and Will Soon Need Help at Home

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Wrinkles should merely indicate where smiles have been. ~Mark Twain, Following the Equator

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ATTENTION! Free Report Reveals Secret Formula For Getting Elder Care at Home …without going broke in the process!

You know instinctively this day is coming. The day when the next call you’ll get could be from a neighbor, a police officer, or just a total stranger who is trying to help your wandering and disoriented parent. The day when they can no longer shop, bathe, or eat by themselves. They day when they call you by a different name.

Any one scenario above can be pre-planned or even avoided. The key is to know what signs to look for!

It’s amazing how much pain and frustration a little bit of planing can save you when the time comes to face a parent’s inevitable decline into a state of permanent convalescence.

The question is, when that day comes  —Will they have the foundation OF care YOU planned and created for them?

Now remember, these are not signs that they need help URGENTLY …but rather not-so-obvious warning signs that NOW it’s the time to start planning some sort of Home Care or personalized caregiver program.

Not knowing these NOT-SO-OBVIOUS warning signs is why almost everyone gets caught unprepared and tool-less.

The result is they are now forced to rush decisions at the worse possible time.

So here they are, 17 warning signs that if you are paying attention and like a detective, uncover the right clues, you will save yourself and your parent a mountain of pain and suffering!

Why?

Because you now know what to look for, and if you know what to look for you can plan ahead.

So be on the look out for:
  1. Frequent falls, visible cuts and bruises.
  2. Need the help of walker to get around house.
  3. When normal conversation stops or takes a depressing tone.
  4. Change in appearance and mood.
  5. No longer interested in activities and fun events.
  6. Excessive arguing and fly-off-the-handle type temper.
  7. Unopened meds and unfilled prescriptions.
  8. Lack of personal hygiene and bathing, strange odor.
  9. Noticeable weigh loss, not eating regularly.
  10. Unopened bills and personal mail.
  11. Frequent fender benders. Look for dents and scratches in car.
  12. Lack of housekeeping signs.
  13. Worsening of existing chronic conditions.
  14. Stale and expired food and drinks.
  15. Broken down house appliances and other items.
  16. Cancelling doctor visits.
  17. Excessive forgetfulness and absent mindedness.

You can complement this list with our very popular Elder Care Guide – and learn how to create a personalized Elderly Care custom plan.

This guide will show you how to build a basic support system at home for your elderly parents with limited coverage and without going broke in the process?

You’ll learn things like:

  • How to leverage the four types of Long Term Care payment sources for maximum value and minimum costs.
  • How to use our 3-Step-Process and 5-Point-Checklist and get the services you need started!
  • How to negotiate bottom line rates with caregivers and home care agencies.
  • How to quickly assess your parent’s finances for Long Term Care and other chronic health conditions …and a half a dozen other hacks and caregiving strategies!

So there you go, you now know more than 90% of everyone out there who may be facing an inevitable care giving scenario this week, but they are not armed with the tools you now have.

But let’s not keep this information all to ourselves!

If you found this post of interest and value, kindly click your favorite social button below and share.

Take care :-)

320x320_crop_claudiopicClaudio Alegre is the Chief Content Writer for Angel Home Care Services on the Web and Patient and Family Relations Advocate off the Web. He lives in Miami with his wife and 3 boys.

 

We find ways to help families get the personal care services at home they need and deserve regardless of the insurance landscape or personal situation!

Call us With Your Questions or Concerns and Get Rid of All That Doubt and Uncertainty! 

CALL:   305-220-4544   [Miami Dade Area]

1-877-746-8908   [For Out of Area Families]

Why Music Therapy for Seniors With Alzheimer’s and Dementia Totally Rocks!

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Did you know that music therapy can alleviate pain, enhance memory and improve communication?

As a caregiver for my senior mom, I know first hand how emotionally painful it is to observe the decline of an Alzheimer’s patient.

During the early stages of the disease, long before she became bed-bound and unresponsive, I experimented with music therapy.

We would sing together as a way of socializing. This also exercised her long-term memory and mental function.

My mom had a background in music and while she could no longer play the piano, she would enjoy listening to songs that reminded her of her youth in Cuba and her 50-year marriage to my father.

She also loved the songs I composed for her on the quarto, a small, 4-stringed guitar.

My mom loved to dance when she was younger and so in spite of her aging body, she could feel rhythm and music “in her bones” even when she was barely capable of carrying a conversation.

I encouraged her to stand up while she still could and perform small, gentle hand and foot movements. Dance became part of our music therapy routine and it exercised her motor-coordination.

Sometimes, she would hum along. No matter what, her face would always LIGHT UP!

MUSIC THERAPY AS A STRATEGY FOR SUNDOWNING RELIEF

My father suffers from dementia and he too benefited from our music therapy. At night, I sang to my parents before I tucked them into bed and we enjoyed the same lullabies they sang to me when I was a child.

Although the bedtime ritual was bittersweet for me, it meant we could bond when short-term memory was fuzzy. My singing would help both my “babies” fall asleep with a sense of security and comfort.

Routine is especially important for the elderly with memory disorders, as they tend to become agitated at night in a state of confusion and restlessness called “sundowning.”

Singing softly at bedtime was not only crucial for my parents’ palliative care but it also soothed me before “me” time. Bedtime music therapy meant that my caregiver work day was over and that I could now take care of my own needs.

Music gave me a respite from the constant worry that resulted from being a parent to my parents. Although I would, of course, have preferred to sing to my parents under happier circumstances, using music as a therapeutic tool brought me a sense of peace and acceptance.

Caught up in the stress of caregiving, I often forgot these simple joys in life.

WHY MUSIC THERAPY IS INCREDIBLY EFFECTIVE

The Alzheimer’s Association offers a more scientific description of what I believe most of us already know intuitively:

This happens because rhythmic and other well-rehearsed responses require little to no cognitive or mental processing. They are influenced by the motor center of the brain that responds directly to auditory rhythmic cues. A person’s ability to engage in music, particularly rhythm playing and singing, remains intact late into the disease process because, again, these activities do not mandate cognitive functioning for success.

In short, music really does soothe the soul and the mind!

For most of us, music is usually a source of joy and connection that’s grounded in our early perception of our surroundings. The first sound we hear is the mother’s heartbeat. Sound and movement are primal to our body’s instinctual relationship to the world.

Those who suffer from Alzheimer’s lose their sense of connectedness; the mental fog of short-term memory loss must be very bewildering.

Sounds that evoke positive, joyful feelings, including laughter, are all means of breaking the painful silence of Alzheimer’s when the patient is no longer capable of responding to other forms of stimuli. Tapping into the music my mother “remembered” was a form of communication for both of us when she could no longer hold a normal conversation.

In my experience as a caregiver for seniors, music therapy supported a sense of well-being once we identified what kind of music would help my parents focus on any task at hand — even the simple task of singing.

One compelling testimonial about the benefits of music therapy comes from Music and Memory, a non-profit organization that brings personalized music into the lives of the elderly or infirm through digital music technology, vastly improving quality of life.

If you care for a loved one with a memory disorder, try going down memory lane with their favorite music. It’ll be good for both of you!

 

maria de los angelesMaria de los Angeles is an award-winning writer based in Miami who became a caregiver to her parents in 2008. Since then, she has been a passionate advocate for eldercare and caregiver issues.

 

If you found this post of interest and value, kindly click your favorite social button below and share.

In the meantime GRAB Your FREE LONG TERM CARE REPORT – An elderly care guide for the times we live in! -And find out how to create a personalized Long Term Care custom plan that works for you!

“I consider Angel Home Care Services pretty much an extension of my family. They have brought order to the chaos in my life!” -E.O, Miami Florida

10 Must Ask Questions Before Hiring a Home Health Aide

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Are you in need of a home health aide for your elderly parents or a loved one, and you don’t know how to go about it? How do you make sure this person or company are legit and not someone with a questionable background? How do you supervise or even rate the care you are getting? How much should you pay for care? Will your insurance cover it?

Not knowing the specific answers to these questions can definitely be a source of stress and fear, especially if you need to act quickly.

But no one with these kinds of needs should be afraid to ask or be ignorant about where to find the answers.

At the end of the day you want the same things we all want as far as caring for a loved one  -To ensure that they are in safe and capable hands!

[Read: When a Health Care Crisis Strikes, Where Do You Start?]

One more thing! …If you feel alone and isolated, you are not!

Roughly half of the United States population has at least one chronic condition, according to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Adults ages 65 and older, 75 percent of whom have chronic conditions, are expected to make up 19 percent of the population by 2030, compared with 12 percent in 2000.

That means you are not the only family member asking those very same questions and experiencing similar fears and concerns about hiring a home health aide or caregiver.

But to help you frame a good strategy if you are ever in the market for a home health aide, here are 10 questions you should ask the agency you are considering working with:

  • What are your recruitment process and your hiring requirements for home health aides?
  • Are your home health aides insured and bonded through the agency?
  • How do you assess their skills?
  • How often do you perform supervision visits?
  • In the event the home health aide is unable to perform how quickly can you substitute the help?
  • If I’m dissatisfied with the home health aide can I request a replacement “without cause”?
  • Are your home health aides up to date with their CEUs (continuing education units)?
  • Do you hire experienced health aides or newly graduated ones?
  • Do you consult with families regarding available community programs that provide personal care and health aide?
  • What other services in addition to home health aide do you provide for families?

Don’t limit yourself to these questions only. If you come up with other questions you feel are important please share them with us. You can do so at our Facebook Page –The Daily Pill, or just simply call us at 305.220.4544

In the meantime grab our FREE Long Term Care Report – An elderly care guide for the times we live in! …and learn how to create a personalized Long Term Care custom plan.

Until next time!

Oh! …and if you found this post of interest and value, please hit your favorite social button below and share :-)

320x320_crop_claudiopicClaudio Alegre is the Chief Content Writer for Angel Home Care Services on the Web and Patient and Family Relations Advocate off the Web. He lives in Miami with his wife and 3 boys.

 

Alzheimer’s Battles Will Be Fought With Brains, But Winning The War Will Be All Heart

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The cost of Alzheimer’s care has been rising rapidly for the past 15 years… and it shows no sign of stopping.  Not only that, the percentage of seniors with Alzheimer’s is on a steep steady climb.

It is now considered an epidemic, between 2010 and 2050, the number of people with Alzheimer’s is expected to jump from 5.5 million to 14 million.

Alzheimer’s currently kills more people than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined. It’s the only disease in the top ten that can’t be slowed, stopped or prevented.

[Read: When a Health Care Crisis Strikes, Where Do You Start?]

Here’s a figure I couldn’t believe when I first read it, where as cancer has a 90% disclosure rate, Alzheimer’s has only a 46% disclosure rate, meaning more than half of the people that are diagnosed are not being told. That includes caregivers as well. We are not doing a good job educating and having the tough conversations.

The financial toll is also staggering. This year it will cost this nation $226 Billion dollars to care for people with AD. By 2050 we could be topping $1 Trillion.

In a study by The Lewin Group, it was revealed that within 10 years, Medicare’s costs of treating Alzheimer’s patients will soar well above 49.3 billion dollars.

See our Family Long Term Care Custom Guide for tips on how to get the help you need even if your insurance won’t cover and you don’t have mega bucks to spare!

As of the time the study was released in 2004, Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease accounted for 34% of Medicare spending, even though they constitute only 12.8% of the population age 65 and older.

This is happening even though Medicare does not pay for the long-term care that people with Alzheimer’s disease need. It is happening because 95% of Medicare beneficiaries with dementia have other chronic conditions common in the elderly, which are exacerbated by their dementia.

The fact of the matter is, Medicare only cares about the rehab potential of your condition, and conditions such as AD and Parkinson’s have little if any rehab potential.

If someone suffers a heart attack or a stroke, and there’s potential for rehab, they’ll continue to pay… but only up to 100 days.  In reality, very few people know the difference between Medicare and Medicaid.  Medicare simply doesn’t pay for long-term, chronic care.  If your loved one has Alzheimer’s, that means that they’ll have to rely on Medicaid if they are out of money to pay privately for care.

You can see the massive predicament you can find yourself in when the average per-person Medicare spending for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is three times higher than average per-person spending across all other seniors. Yet Medicare won’t cover the long term effects of AD.

Regarding Medicaid, the expenditures associated with Alzheimer’s disease are high because of the uninsured cost of long-term care.

Nearly half of Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia also qualify for Medicaid, because they have exhausted their own resources paying for long term care.

At least half of all nursing home residents have dementia. They are the residents with the longest stays and the ones most likely to spend down to Medicaid.

You have options, but you have to understand what the disease process, laws and healthcare regulations are and how you or a loved can leverage them to your needs and advantage.

[Read: 2015 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures]

To beat Alzheimer’s we are going to have to work as a team, because Alzheimer’s wears you down, it’s not a single person affliction, it strikes all of us in one way or another, as a son, daughter, husband, wife, friend and caregiver.

Alzheimer’s Battles Will Be Fought With Brains, But Winning The War Will Be All Heart.”

For strategies on how to pay for Long Term Care you can’t afford and your insurance won’t cover, we’ve put together a Custom Guide that will show you the options you have to care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or Dementia without going broke in the process.

So grab our FREE Long Term Care ReportAn elderly care guide for the times we live in! …and find out how you can start making sense of all this.

 

Oh! …and if you found this post of interest and value, please hit your favorite social button below and share :-)

When a Health Care Crisis Hits, Where Do You Start?

healthcare crisis

Long Term Care Secret Guide

When a health care crisis hits, where do you start?

Initially you’ll be in shock and disoriented, but it’ll pass and then it will be time to gather and organize.

Every family situation is different, there are many factors that will dictate how you will start the process of caring for a convalescent spouse or family member.

One thing I’d like you know …you are not alone!

You will feel alone because this is the first time you are going through something like this, but listen to me …YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

There are incredible support groups made up of amazing people that you can get help and guidance from, seek them out. I’ll show you how shortly.

You may need information on organizing and developing a care plan, long distance care giving, family interactions, and emotional support for your other parent or family members. Other care givers may need information on legal issues, financial planning, and available housing options.

There will likely be medical questions, and confusion over Medicare, Medicaid and HMOs and what they covers. 

See our Family Long Term Care Custom Guide for tips on how to get the help you need even if your insurance won’t cover and you don’t have mega bucks to spare!

In a crisis situation, we recommend that you focus immediately on the following issues:

Care giver burnout: Relief and guidance can come from support groups, family service agencies, professional geriatric care managers, hospital senior services, adult day care centers, volunteer agencies, transportation agencies, friendly visiting services, peer counselors respite programs, and mental health associations.

Financial and legal planning: Your local Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) office, an elder law attorney, Social Security and Medicare offices, Social Services departments and the Legal Counsel for the Elderly office can provide information and referrals to professionals.

Home care: Home health care agencies, places of worship, senior centers, hospices, neighbors and friends, community college job boards, civic groups, and Family Service Agencies are all good resources. Check the Yellow Pages for other listings under Counseling Services, private geriatric care managers, the Red Cross, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Hospice: Check the Yellow Pages under Hospice, Area Agency on Aging (AAA), hospitals and long-term care facilities.

Medical care: Contact your parent’s physician and other health professionals, mental health professionals, community mental health centers, hospital discharge planners or social workers, visiting nurse services, hospices, local and national medical associations, senior centers, family service agencies, adult protective services, and rehabilitation centers.

Nursing homes/long-term care facilities: Resources include hospital discharge planners, doctors and nurses, family and friends, community social service agencies, local or state long-term care ombudsman programs, the Continuing Care Accreditation Commission, and care management professionals.

We’ll be coming back to a lot of these topics in more detail in the next few days.

In the meantime grab our FREE Long Term Care Report – An elderly care guide for the times we live in! …and find out how you can start making sense of all this.

Stay informed and remember, your are not alone!

Claudio Alegre

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